“Real work always seems to involve a certain amount of unpleasant, grinding effort though, and startups often have a lot of it. It’s like having a baby. It’s 5% cute, adorable moments, and 95% dirty diapers and vomit. ¶ The key to loving these more unpleasant moments is meaning. If we genuinely care about and believe in our mission, then those difficult times begin to take on a more heroic quality.”
Paul Buchheit, The Technology
“That architecture is all the stuff I spent ten years ranting on this blog about, but y’all don’t listen, so I’m just going to have to build company after company that runs my own wacky operating system, and eventually you’ll catch on. It’s OK to put people first. You don’t have to be a psychopath or work people to death or create heaps of messy code or work in noisy open offices.”
Joel Spolsky, Trello, Inc.
“Here’s how to hack your culture: treat the people who work for you like the smart adults they are. Tell them everything you can about what you genuinely expect from them and how they can make a positive contribution through their work to the future of the company. Encourage them to go home at a sensible hour and have a life that is separate to work. And forget the idea that culture – and, by extension, people – is something you can hack.”
“If you tell me you want to ‘hack’ your culture, what I hear is, ‘I don’t know how to make the people working for me simultaneously more engaged and more productive, so I’m going to attempt to manipulate them in ways based entirely on my own misunderstanding of human behaviour and hope that gives me the results I’m looking for’.”